Exercise 16 - Take-off

This exercise will be incorporated into every lesson and will be practiced thoroughly before solo.

Crosswind Take-off

Short Field Takeoff

Soft Field Takeoff

 

Reference Material

• FTM (Flight Training Manual)

• Aircraft Information Manual/Pilot Operating Handbook (POH)

• Ground Instruction Notes

 

Preparation

• Review the radio communication procedures for you airport.

• Review the takeoff procedures and the checklists associated with the take-off.

• Review and memorize the after take-off checklist.

• Be able to answer the following questions:

1) Which way will the aircraft yaw with power application on the runway?

2) At what speed do we rotate at in the aircraft (POH)?

3) At what altitude shall you initiate your after take-off check?

4) What speed should be climb out at after rotation?

5) What is a go/no-go point? What does it mean?

6) Do we take-off with flaps in this aircraft? Can we?

7) Do we maintain a track or heading after departure?

8) What are your actions if the engine quits at 200ft after take-off?

9) How do we conduct a rejected takeoff? Why would we do a rejected takeoff?

 

Tips/Rules of Thumb/Theory

• When holding short for take-off, turn the nose slightly towards the arrival path and check for landing traffic.

• During climb, complete a lookout by lowering the nose of the aircraft every 500 feet.

• Right rudder input is required when adding power.

• Use your peripheral vision to detect the change in heading during the climb as you cannot see a reference ahead of the nose.

 

 

Crosswind Take-off

Preparation

• Review the crosswind takeoff procedures for your aircraft.

• Review how to counteract drift and maintain a proper track.

• Be able to answer the following questions:

1) Which way will the aircraft yaw with power application on the runway?

2) At what speed do we rotate at in the aircraft (POH)? What is there is a crosswind?

3) How do we position the aileron at the beginning of the takeoff roll? What are their positions at rotation?

4) Are there crosswind limitations on the aircraft? Are they actually limitations?

5) What are some factors that could limit the maximum crosswind?

 

Tips/Rules of Thumb/Theory

• Allow the aircraft to crab after take-off to maintain a proper track unless you are to fly a heading.

• Just because the POH may have a maximum demonstrated crosswind, it doesn't mean it is YOURs.

• In gusty conditions, consider rotating a bit after the published rotation speed.

• Be aware of possible illusions in strong windy conditions.

 

 

Short Field Take-off

Preparation

• Review the short field takeoff procedures for your aircraft.

• Review controlling the aircraft in slow flight and the aircraft's types of climbs.

• Be able to answer the following questions:

1) What is the rotation speed of the aircraft? Why is it lower than normal?

2) What affects the aircraft’s rotation speed when performing a short field takeoff? Where can we find this information?

3) What is a go/no-go point? What should happen at or near this point?

4) How do we calculate the take-off distance?

5) What factors affect the aircraft’s takeoff and landing distance?

6)  Which flap settings would you use for a short field takeoff?

 

Tips/Rules of Thumb/Theory

• Allow the aircraft to crab after take-off to maintain a proper track unless you are to fly a heading.

• Just because the POH may have a maximum demonstrated crosswind, it doesn't mean it is YOURs.

• In gusty conditions, consider rotating a bit after the published rotation speed. 

•  When performing a short field take off at an uncontrolled airport, say “Taking Off Rwy __ with a short delay.” No need to say why, no one needs to know.

•  Do not attempt a takeoff if you have any doubt about your ability to safely complete the maneuver. Options may include waiting until evening for cooler temperatures, waiting until the wind is down the runway or offloading baggage or passengers.

 

 

Soft/Unprepared Field Take-off

Preparation

• Review the soft field takeoff procedures for your aircraft.

• Review controlling the aircraft in slow flight and the aircraft's types of climbs.

• Be able to answer the following questions:

1) When would you use a this technique? Would you only use it on a grass field?

2) What is ground effect? How does it affect the aircraft's performance?

3) Explain how the aircraft utilizes ground effect for take-off.

4) How do we calculate the take-off distance?

5) What considerations must we have for the nose wheel of the aircraft when taking off.

6)  Which flap settings would you use for a soft field takeoff?

 

Tips/Rules of Thumb/Theory

• Having too much nose up attitude on the take-off roll will increase drag and increase the distance to rotation.

•  An obstacle present at the end of a soft field will require that the aircraft be transitioned to the obstacle clearance speed after lift off during a soft field take-off.

• Special care must be taken in windy conditions while performing this maneuver as you may be airborne below the stall speed.

• If you are actually on grass, a large amount of power will be required to move the aircraft. Consider having full power in before aligned with the centreline so that you have momentum carrying you into the takeoff roll.

 

 

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